The CST is proud to contribute to the Princeton University curriculum across 19 different departments and programs and support 5 of the 8 distinct distribution requirements. On this page, you will find courses the CST has helped lead and/or design.

Spring 2024

Ethnographic Data Visualization (SA)
Subject associations
ANT 456 / STC 456

The world has become datafied (measured, classified, digitized, sold, amassed as data), and visualizations are a potent public medium. They drive critical concerns like global warming and inequality, and can be used with many other disciplinary issues. We connect data vis to our challenges to intelligibly represent the complex relationships, forces, and multiple scales embedded in ethnographic settings and theories. If data vis gives us a grip on these imperceptible factors, and the datafied world, what gets filtered out of data or optics? We will critically use data vis tools alongside other modalities to enrich our anthropological vision.

Instructors
Jeffrey D. Himpele
The Science of Roman History (EC or SEN)
Subject associations
CLA 247 / HUM 249 / STC 247 / ENV 247

Roman history courses usually cover grand narratives based on literary evidence and usually no room for discussing how knowledge is created and the different methods for studying ancient history. This course instead looks at different questions to shed light in fruitful collaborations between scholars from different fields. Students will engage with STEM and digital humanities methods as they consider historical questions. Through different case studies and hands-on activities, students will learn how different scientific, technological, and computational methods help us employ a multi-disciplinary approach to learning about the ancient past.

Instructors
Caroline Cheung
Leigh A. Lieberman
Making Sense of Artificial Intelligence: Fiction, Technology, Storytelling (EC or LA)
Subject associations
HUM 349 / STC 350 / COM 374 / CDH 349

Artificial intelligence existed in fiction well before the first computer was built. In fact, storytelling and AI appear to be inseparable: apart from countless science-fiction works, stories ranging from mass unemployment to doomsday scenarios have become entangled with real-world AI and its development. This class studies some iconic representations of AI in the arts alongside non-fiction texts that shed some light on how AI works, its potentialities, limits, and biases. In so doing, we will make sense of the stories that we read about AI, and reflect on whether the former can teach us anything about the latter.

Instructors
Andrea Capra
From DNA to Human Complexity (SEL)
Subject associations
MOL 101 / STC 101

This lecture and lab course will acquaint non-biology majors with modern molecular biology focusing on topics of current interest to society. The course covers fundamental topics such as information storage and readout by DNA, RNA and proteins. The course addresses how recent scientific advances influence issues relevant to humanity including stem cells and CRISPR; the human microbiome and bacterial pathogens; vaccines and the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic; how a single cell contains all the necessary instructions to build a complex multicellular organism; and how the human genome can be used to understand the evolution of modern humans.

Instructors
Bonnie L. Bassler
Ricardo Mallarino
Jodi Schottenfeld-Roames
Magic Materials (SEL)
Subject associations
MSE 200 / STC 200

When something seems to defy our understanding of how the world works, we would call it magical. Throughout human history, development of new materials was associated with magic because it made things that were formerly impossible or incomprehensible possible. The durability of a steel tool must have seemed magical for the bronze age worker. The Internet, instant access to all information of humankind at the touch of a button would have been incomprehensible a hundred years ago. This class will talk about the magic materials people encountered throughout history, what equates to magic materials today and how might they shape our future.

Instructors
Kai A. Filsinger
Transformations in Engineering and the Arts (LA)
Subject associations
STC 209A / EGR 209A / MUS 209A

STC 209 examines 'transformations' within and between visuals, sound, structure and movement as art and engineering forms. The course explores generative art and design that leverages parallels and interplay between design processes in engineering and the arts. Students will learn to work as artist-engineers, and will create ambitious open-ended design projects exploring these themes. Taught by faculty from CST, COS, MUS, CEE along with visiting artists, and guest faculty from the Lewis Center for the Arts.

Instructors
Adam Finkelstein
Penelope Georges
Naomi E. Leonard
Transformations in Engineering and the Arts (SEL)
Subject associations
STC 209B / EGR 209B / MUS 209B

STC 209 examines 'transformations' within and between visuals, sound, structure and movement as art and engineering forms. The course explores generative art and design that leverages parallels and interplay between design processes in engineering and the arts. Students will learn to work as artist-engineers, and will create ambitious open-ended design projects exploring these themes. Taught by faculty from CST, COS, MUS, CEE along with visiting artists, and guest faculty from the Lewis Center for the Arts.

Instructors
Adam Finkelstein
Penelope Georges
Naomi E. Leonard
The Glass Class (SEL)
Subject associations
FRS 114

Glass is so ubiquitous in our daily lives that we barely notice it anymore. Yet, our modern lives would have been very different (or nearly impossible) without it. Although one may associate glass with only windows or containers, glass, as a class of material, has far-reaching applications in global communications, biomedical, and energy industries! In fact, glass has enabled so many technologies in the past 50 years, some may argue that we now live in the "Glass Age". This interdisciplinary seminar will take a deep dive into the science of glass, with discussions of history, art, and societal impact.

Instructors
Vivian Feng
Special Topics in STEM: Making Art from Science (LA or SEN)
Subject associations
STC 299 / THR 299

This course is a collaboration between science and creative expression. Students will develop an understanding of the fundamental role that microbes (viruses, bacteria, and other microorganisms) have played in environmental stability and human evolution. We will then explore the impact of microbes on climate change and discuss innovation and solutions. Concurrently, we will be exploring various forms of creative expression (writing, movement, improvisation, image making, etc.), with which to playfully observe, meditate and communicate the scientific material. Students will collaborate on final creative projects.

Instructors
Anthar S. Darwish
Vivia Font

Fall 2023

Building Science and Technology: Building Systems
Subject associations
ARC 311 / STC 311

In preparation for a fluid and evolving contemporary design practice, this course introduces physical prototyping and computational design strategies for an era of environmental transformation and climate crisis. Across platforms and instruments, exercises and readings emphasize process development as a core competency in architecture. A lecture component provides a technological overview, situated in a long-term cultural perspective and a theoretical framework. Focused lab modules provides exposure to a range of prototyping and fabrication resources at SOA, where students gain hands on experience.

Body Builders: Living Systems as Art Media (SEL)
Subject associations
FRS 127

This course will explore the crossover collaborative of bioengineering and art, presenting the notion of bioengineering as an artistic practice. A creative portrayal has the potential to humanize this highly technical field. Advancements in the field of biotechnology will be examined as potential tools to not only improve health care, but also as an art medium. The course material will expose students to organisms manipulated in an imaginative context and consider how these artistic ventures may affect public perception of emerging biomedical technologies.

Visualizing Nature: Techniques in Field Biology (SEL)
Subject associations
FRS 129

This seminar explores the process of scientific inquiry by investigating the many ways in which field biologists observe and study organisms in the lab and field. Through hands-on learning experiences in the lab and field, we will combine technology, problem-solving skills, and creativity to collect and interpret behavioral, morphological, physiological, and sensory data in living and non-living organisms. This course will include coordinated trips during class time to local sites in the Princeton area, and also offers an optional 3-week field experience at Mpala Research Centre located in Laikipia, Kenya during January 2024.

Physics for Future Leaders (SEL)
Subject associations
PHY 115B / STC 115B

What do informed citizens and future leaders of our society need to know about physics and technology? This course is designed for non-scientists who will someday become our informed citizens and decision-makers. Whatever the field of endeavor, they will be faced with crucial decisions in which physics and technology play an important role. This course will present the key principles and the basic physical reasoning needed to interpret scientific and technical information to make the best decisions. Topics include energy and power, atomic and subatomic matter, wave-like phenomena and light, and technologies based on advances in physics.

Physics for Future Leaders (SEN)
Subject associations
PHY 115A / STC 115A

What do informed citizens and future leaders of our society need to know about physics and technology? This course is designed for non-scientists who will someday become our informed citizens and decision-makers. Whatever the field of endeavor, they will be faced with crucial decisions in which physics and technology play an important role. This course will present the key principles and the basic physical reasoning needed to interpret scientific and technical information to make the best decisions. Topics include energy and power, atomic and subatomic matter, wave-like phenomena and light, and technologies based on advances in physics.

Musical Instruments, Sound, Perception, and Creativity (LA or SEL)
Subject associations
STC 204 / MUS 204

Musical instruments reside at the intersection of varied topics: sound, perception, embodiment, music theory, social values, and more; how has their design influenced the development of music and how might they be reinvented to spur new ideas? We will explore these questions through readings, listening, analysis, labs, and composition. Specific topics include: harmony and the keyboard; tuning and temperament; preparing the piano, digital and analog. More generally, we will consider the productive tension between qualitative and quantitative understandings of musical concepts.

Origami Engineering
Subject associations
CEE 345 / STC 345 / MSE 345 / MAE 327

This class acquaints the student with the state-of-art concepts and algorithms to design and analyze origami systems (assemblies, structures, tessellations, etc). Students will learn how to understand, create and transform geometries by folding and unfolding concepts, and thus apply origami concepts to solve engineering and societal problems. In addition, using origami as a tool, we will outreach to some fundamental concepts in differential geometry.

Autonomous Fabrication and Robotics
Subject associations
CEE 374 / STC 374

An introductory course with several demonstration and hands-on components of fabrication with autonomous and robotic systems. Covers formal methods of fabrication and programming of moderately complex elements, including related fabrication platforms, extrusion platforms, various designs of material, structure, and programming of toolpath. The course is centered around lectures with laboratory/virtual studio individual and team-based assignments involving computer-controlled additive manufacturing and robotic systems, student reading, and peer-reviewed presentation and reporting assignments.

Diseases in Children: Causes, Costs, and Choices (EM)
Subject associations
MOL 460 / STC 460 / GHP 460

Within a broad context of historical, social, and ethical concerns, a survey of normal childhood development and selected disorders from the perspectives of the physician, the biologist, and the bioethicist. There is an emphasis on the complex relationship between genetic and acquired causes of disease, the environment, medical practice, social conditions, and cultural values. The course features visits from children with some of the conditions discussed, site visits, and readings from the original medical, scientific, and bioethical literature.

Writing about Science (SEN)
Subject associations
STC 349 / ENV 349 / JRN 349

This course will teach STEM & non-STEM majors how to write about research in STEM fields with clarity and a bit of flair. Goal will be to learn to convey technical topics to non-experts in a compelling, enjoyable way while staying true to the underlying facts, context and concepts. We'll do this through readings, class discussion, encounters with professional writers and journalists of all sorts, across several different media. Most important of all, students will practice what they learn in frequent writing assignments that will be critiqued extensively by an experienced science journalist.

Storytelling with Technology for Performance (LA)
Subject associations
THR 210 / STC 210

Technology and images surround us and evolve constantly. How can we use them to tell the stories we want to tell? Students will learn techniques from design professionals, engaging directly and collaboratively with creative technologies, to design experiences of live performance, public art, and interactive or immersive installations. We will examine philosophies of world-building and storytelling, as students develop their own practice.Technologies covered may include projection mapping, multimedia, motion capture, 3D immersive environments, interactivity and sensors, lighting, and programming for creative applications.

Spring 2023

Technology and the Environment (SEN)
Subject associations
FRS 114
Transformations in Engineering and the Arts (LA)
Subject associations
STC 209A / EGR 209A / MUS 209A
Transformations in Engineering and the Arts (SEL)
Subject associations
STC 209B / EGR 209B / MUS 209B
Transformative Questions in Biology (HA or SEN)
Subject associations
STC 297 / HIS 297 / MOL 297 / HUM 297

Fall 2022

Body Builders: Living Systems as Art Media (SEL)
Subject associations
FRS 127
Visualizing Nature: Techniques in Field Biology (SEL)
Subject associations
FRS 129
Physics for Future Leaders (SEL)
Subject associations
PHY 115B / STC 115B
Musical Instruments, Sound, Perception, and Creativity (LA or SEL)
Subject associations
STC 204 / MUS 204
Origami Engineering
Subject associations
CEE 345 / STC 345 / MSE 345 / MAE 327
Autonomous Fabrication and Robotics
Subject associations
CEE 374 / STC 374
Climate: Past, Present, and Future (SEN)
Subject associations
GEO 102A / ENV 102A / STC 102A
Climate: Past, Present, and Future (SEL)
Subject associations
GEO 102B / ENV 102B / STC 102B
Diseases in Children: Causes, Costs, and Choices (EM)
Subject associations
MOL 460 / STC 460 / GHP 460
Physics for Future Leaders (SEN)
Subject associations
PHY 115A / STC 115A
Writing about Science (SEN)
Subject associations
STC 349 / ENV 349 / JRN 349
Storytelling with Technology for Performance (LA or QCR)
Subject associations
THR 210 / STC 210