Cross-Listed Courses

ANT 309A/STC 310A (SA) and 309B/310B (STL)  

Forensic Anthropology and Epigenetics in Urban America

Course Faculty: Jeffrey D. Himpele (link is external)and Janet M. Monge (link is external)

Forensic anthropology involves medico-legal cases where human remains have lost "personhood" (an individual cannot be identified due to decomposition or destruction of unique personal features). We will explore techniques of analysis that biological anthropologists apply to forensic cases. We will blend the sub-disciplines of social and biological anthropology by tracing the intertwined physiological and social factors that shape human variation and life experience in an urban setting. We weigh and consider epigenetic mechanisms by which external variables may bring about heritable molecular changes in the expression of genetic phenotypes.

GEO/ENV/STC 102A (STN)

(link is external)Climate: Past, Present, and Future

Course Faculty: Daniel M. Sigman (link is external)

Which human activities are changing our climate, and does climate change constitute a significant problem? We will investigate these questions through an introduction to climate processes and an exploration of climate from the distant past to today. We will also consider the implications of climate change for the global environment and humans. Intended to be accessible to students not concentrating in science or engineering.

GEO/ENV/STC 102B (STL)

(link is external)Climate: Past, Present, and Future

Course Faculty: Danielle M. Schmitt (link is external)and Daniel M. Sigman (link is external)

Which human activities are changing our climate, and does climate change constitute a significant problem? We will investigate these questions through an introduction to climate processes and an exploration of climate from the distant past to today. We will also consider the implications of climate change for the global environment and humans. Intended to be accessible to students not concentrating in science or engineering.

MOL/STC/GHP 460

(link is external)Diseases in Children: Causes, Costs, and Choices

Course Faculty: Daniel A. Notterman (link is external)

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Within a broader context of historical, social, and ethical concerns, a survey of normal childhood development and selected disorders from the perspectives of the physician and the scientist. Emphasis on the complex relationship between genetic and acquired causes of disease, medical practice, social conditions, and cultural values. The course features visits from children with some of the conditions discussed, site visits, and readings from the original medical and scientific literature. Prerequisite: 214 or 215. Two 90-minute classes and an evening 90-minute precept.

PHY/STC 115A (STN)

(link is external)Physics for Future Leaders

Course Faculty: Peter D. Meyers (link is external)

What do future leaders of our society need to know about physics and technology? The course is designed for non-scientists who will someday become our influential citizens and decision-makers. Whatever the field of endeavor, they will be faced with important decisions in which physics and technology play an important role. The purpose of this course is to present the key principles and the basic physical reasoning needed to interpret scientific and technical information and to make the best decisions. Topics include energy and power, atomic and subatomic matter, wave-like phenomena and light, and Einstein's theory of relativity

THR/STC 210A (LA) and 210B (QR)

(link is external)Storytelling with Technology for Performance

Course Faculty: David K. Bengali (link is external)and Sharon L. De La Cruz (link is external)

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Telling stories through performance is human nature, but how can we use technology to enhance, frame, or reveal new perspectives on stories told? Students will learn about tools and techniques from design professionals, and will engage directly and collaboratively with technology to design experiences focused around live performance. Areas covered may include projections and multimedia, lighting, interactivity, and programming for creative applications. This class hopes to bring together students with arts and STEM backgrounds, and does not require prior experience.

HIS/STC 391

History of Contemporary Science

Course Faculty: Michael D. Gordin

More science has been done since 1970 than in the history of the world before that date--- combined. This course traces a series of developments in contemporary science across a broad array of disciplines, with the goal of illuminating the historical processes that have brought them about and providing students with a set of tools to understand the particular position of the sciences in today's world. Topics covered include AIDS, nuclear power, string theory, evolutionary psychology, brain drain, and genomics.